March 2020 - Wakunaga of America

Dr. Ward Bond Interviews Jay Levy About Aged Garlic Extract on RadioMD Podcast

This interview aired on March 26, and is now available on Dr. Bond’s website here: http://radiomd.com/show/life-changing-wellness/item/41984-ep-92-the-age-of-garlic

Dr. Ward Bond

Dr. Bond is widely known from his writings, his television and radio appearances, and his lectures, as one of America’s most prominent authorities on what has become a “hot” topic: the use of natural, safe supplements to combat problems of our health and to head off potential problems associated with aging.

Jay Levy

Jay Levy is the National Sales Director at Wakunaga of America. Jay Levy has also been a health educator when it comes to the use and effectiveness of Kyolic,  Wakunaga’s Aged Garlic which is at the base of their Kyolic line of supplements.

This article is for informational purposes only. This article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice.

Top 4 Foods to Keep Your Immune System in Fighting Shape

More and more research is showing that your diet is a super important indicator of how long you’ll live. In light of that, and the fact that March is National Nutrition Month, we have put together a list of foods and drinks to add to your plate so you can get boost and strengthen your immune system.Here are some of the top foods to add to your diet:

Cruciferous vegetables: Cruciferous vegetables, including broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, and kale, have the unique ability to modify human hormones, and activate the body’s natural detoxification system. The cruciferous phytochemical sulforaphane has also been found to protect the blood vessel wall from inflammatory signaling that can lead to heart disease.1 These vegetables should be chewed thoroughly or eaten shredded, chopped or juiced, to release their healthy properties.

Speaking of greens, raw leafy green vegetables are helpful too. They are rich in the essential B-vitamin folate, plus lutein and zeaxanthin, which are carotenoids that protect the eyes from light damage2. These greens include collard greens, mustard greens, spinach or lettuce. Drinking your greens is an easy way to get them into your diet too, if you don’t feel like snacking on them. Look for a powdered greens drink mix that contains organic and naturally-sourced grasses, ancient grains, fruits, vegetables, and alkalizing superfoods like chlorella and spirulina which will support your immune system.

Fatty Fish: We’ve always heard that fish is considered “brain food,” and with good reason! Research shows that compounds in fish called carotenoids can protect against some neurological diseases. Also, a study published in the BMJ (British Medical Journal) reinforces that the omega-3s in fatty fish-like salmon, tuna, and sardines—can help you live a longer, healthier life. After analyzing data from more than 2,600 American adults with the average age of 74, researchers from Tufts University found that people with higher levels of omega-3s in their blood (meaning they ate at least two servings of fish per week) had an 18 percent lower risk of unhealthy aging.3 This means they were less likely to suffer from chronic disease, experience cognitive decline, or having problems living their day-to-day life.

Nuts: Are almonds one of your favorite snacks? Well they could be adding years to your life! Two studies from the Harvard School of Public Health both found that the more often people ate nuts, the lower their risk of dying young. In fact, people who ate nuts twice daily were 20 percent less likely to die from heart disease and respiratory diseases, than those who don’t.4 Nuts are full of nutrients that protect your heart and fight inflammation, such as unsaturated fats, fiber, folate, vitamin E, potassium, magnesium, calcium, and antioxidants.

Berries: Who knew there could be such huge health benefits in such small packages? Berries are rich in antioxidants, including vitamins A, C, and E, which protect your cells from damage and disease. Some berries also contain resveratrol, which helps to lower inflammation and prevent clogged arteries. Additionally, berries contain nutrients called flavonoids, which give berries their brilliant colors and may help protect against inflammation and heart disease.5    Try and snack on some of these in your spare time: blueberries, raspberries, and blackberries.

Besides these foods above, incorporating a probiotic supplement can be helpful in keeping your digestive system running smoothly as you add these healthy foods to your diet, and can also promote healthy immune function. Look for one that is shelf-stable, clinically tested, DNA sequence verified, and one that does not require refrigeration.

While we are on the subject of healthy eating, there are many different diets out right now, with new ones being introduced every month. We recommend, instead of going all in with the current “fad” diet, start by making small, incremental changes in your life. For example, start by taking a closer look at your food, for instance, and making some healthy swaps. Then move onto the next area for improvement. Building slowly over time will help you create a new lifestyle in a relatively painless way, that you will be able to stick with.

References

  1. https://www.verywellhealth.com/best-foods-for-longevity-4005852
  2. https://www.verywellhealth.com/best-foods-for-longevity-4005852
  3. https://www.prevention.com/food-nutrition/g20473901/5-foods-to-eat-to-live-longer/
  4. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1307352
  5. https://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/news/20160404/berries-nutrition-perks#1

This article is for informational purposes only. This article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice.

Forget Smoking it. Here are the Grasses You Need to Drink, ASAP

Now though, there is a third type of grass that is brought up in conversation, oftentimes at a gym, juice shop, or health club. We are talking about wheatgrass! And grasses like wheatgrass, such as barley grass, alfalfa grass and other nutritious grasses. If you aren’t big on salads and other leafy greens, another easy way to get your greens is by drinking them.

Many studies over the years have shown that green foods have marked beneficial effects on cholesterol, blood pressure, and immune response. Nutritionally, green foods, grasses, to be exact, are close cousins to dark leafy vegetables, and offer far greater levels of nutrient density. In other words, an ounce of these concentrated green foods contains much more of the beneficial phytonutrients that are found in an ounce of green leafy vegetables1.

Get to Know Your Grasses

If dark leafy greens aren’t making a regular appearance on your dinner plate, you may want to become familiar with the following grasses:

Barley Grass: Boasting an array of antioxidants, barley was the very first cereal grain ever cultivated by humans, dating back to 7000 BC. Along with vitamins A,C,E, beta-carotene, and B vitamins, barley grass is a rich source of potassium, calcium, iron, phosphorus, and magnesium. Barley grass also provides chlorophyll, amino acids, protein, fiber, and enzymes. Most importantly, barley grass is a source of superoxide dismutase (SOD), a critical enzyme that helps neutralize the harmful effects of free radicals.

According to a recent report in the journal Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, barley grass has numerous health benefits. It is a natural detoxifier that protects the liver. It also supports healthy blood pressure, enhances immunity, improves digestive health, has blood glucose supporting effects, promotes cardiovascular health, improves cognition, lessens fatigue, and acts as an anti-inflammatory2. Many of these actions may be due to barley grass’ ability to tip the body’s balance towards alkalinity. Because it benefits the body on so many fronts, barley grass is considered an exceptional superfood.

Wheat grass: This juice bar staple is an excellent source of vitamins A, C, and E, as well as iron, magnesium, calcium, and amino acids. Among its 17 amino acids, 8 are considered essential, meaning your body can’t produce them – they must come from your diet. Wheatgrass is a powerful source of glutathione, known as the “master” antioxidant. It’s little wonder that preliminary research has found that wheatgrass reduces oxidative damage to cells. Other studies suggest that wheatgrass may support healthy cholesterol levels, aid in balancing blood sugar, counter an inappropriate inflammatory response, and induce the destruction of damaged or abnormal cells3. Like barley grass, wheatgrass is a powerful alkalinizing agent that supports balanced pH.

Alfalfa grass: Alfalfa is a type of grass that has been grown and used as feed for livestock for hundreds of years. It was long prized for its superior content of vitamins, minerals, and protein, compared to other feed sources. In addition to being used as feed, it also has a long history of use in a nutritional capacity for humans. Alfalfa is high in vitamin K and also contains many other nutritious ingredients like vitamin C, copper, manganese folate, and even plant compounds like flavonoids, saponins, and phytosterols. It has also been shown to lower cholesterol levels in both animals and humans. The effect is attributed to the high content of saponins, which are plant compounds known to lower cholesterol levels. They do this by decreasing absorption of cholesterol in the gut and increasing the excretion of compounds used to create new cholesterol4.

These nutritional grasses are ready to give you a steady stream of nutrients and keep you strong and powerful throughout the day. Try adding some to your daily smoothie or green drink!

This article is for informational purposes only. This article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice.

 


References

  1. https://www.oprah.com/health/barley-grass-wheatgrass-and-green-foods-superfood-no-6/all
  2. https://kyolic.com/healthyguides/Great-Greens/index.html?page=6
  3. https://kyolic.com/healthyguides/Great-Greens/index.html?page=6
  4. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/alfalfa#section2